Wanda J. Hall - Westford Real Estate



Posted by Wanda J. Hall on 9/17/2018

Concord, MA:

This Single-Family in Concord, MA recently sold for $1,680,000.
This is a Colonial style home and features 12 total rooms, 5 full baths, 1 half bath, 5 bedrooms, 0.84 acres, and was sold by
Wanda J. Hall - Westford Real Estate




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Posted by Wanda J. Hall on 9/17/2018

Ready to sell your condo? As a first-time condo seller, it sometimes can be tough to streamline the process of finding interested property buyers and getting the best price for your residence.

Fortunately, we're here to help you simplify the process of selling your condo.

Here are three tips that every first-time condo seller needs to know.

1. Check Out the Prices of Comparable Condos

When you price your condo, it is important to set realistic expectations from the get-go. And if you ask too much for your property, it may linger on the real estate market for an extended period of time.

On the other hand, an informed condo seller will have real estate market data that he or she can use to gain an advantage over the competition.

How does your condo stack up against similar properties? Perform an in-depth assessment of the competition, and you'll be able to price your condo accordingly.

Check out the prices of recently sold and currently available condos. By doing so, you can better understand how to price your condo competitively.

Also, spend some time performing assorted condo interior and exterior repairs before you add your property to the real estate market. This will allow you to boost your condo's appearance both inside and out and make your property an appealing choice to condo buyers.

2. Conduct a Property Appraisal

Hire a property appraiser to inspect your condo. That way, you can receive expert insights into your condo's strengths and weaknesses.

During a condo evaluation, a property appraiser will review all aspects of a property. He or she then will provide you with an in-depth report that you can use to understand potential problem areas with your condo.

A property appraisal is a valuable learning opportunity, and you should try to make the most of it.

Choose a property appraiser with condo experience. This professional will be able to take a close look at your condo and help you prioritize potential repairs.

In addition, review a property appraiser's findings closely. This information will help you determine the best ways to enhance your condo and ensure it can stand out from the competition.

3. Work with a Real Estate Agent

When it comes to selling your condo, it is always a good idea to work with a real estate agent.

Hiring a real estate agent with condo experience is a must, particularly for a first-time condo seller. This real estate professional will teach you about the ins and outs of the housing market and help you promote your condo to the right groups of property buyers.

A real estate agent will set up condo showings and open houses and negotiate with condo buyers on your behalf. Plus, he or she will offer honest, unbiased condo selling recommendations to help you get the best price for your property.

Don't leave anything to chance as you get ready to sell your condo. Take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you can accelerate the process of selling your condo.




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Posted by Wanda J. Hall on 9/10/2018

It can feel like real estate has its own language. After all, there is a reason agents take courses and need to become licensed!

And for a first-time buyer, I understand that it can be overwhelming and very confusing to keep track of all of this new information on top choosing the home of your dreams and planning a move.

Which is why I’ve created this quick and dirty list of real estate terms every first time home buyer needs to know.

Let’s get started:

A kick-out clause gives the seller the option to continue showing a house after a buyer has made their offer but is slowing down the process with the sale of their own home. The seller can then “kick out” that offer if someone else puts in a more desirable, and readily available, one.

A title-search is simply a search to pull up relevant information to the title of a house. It helps to determine the history of the home and if there are existing regulations in place that affect the property.

Escrow is a neutral third party used to handle transactions throughout the buying/selling process. They hold all related documents and funds until the day of the sale.

Earnest money is usually held in an escrow account and represents your commitment to the sale of a house you have made an offer on. Typically, the amount out down is between 1-3% of the asking price. It is also called “good faith money”.

An appraisal determines a property’s market value. Only a licensed appraiser can pull a report of this information for you. This is the report a lender will use to determine whether or not to lend money to a borrower.

Closing costs are paid at the actual sale of the house. The “closing” is when the title is transferred from the seller over to the buyer. The cost covers all of the fees that were incurred throughout the buying and selling process. A few examples of these fees are the home inspection, appraisal, and escrow. 

A comparative market analysis or CMA is a report pulled from a database your real estate agent has access to. This is then used to determine the offering and asking price of homes.

A contingency is when in order to move forward with a sale there are specific requirements the buyer must complete first. Common contingencies are: waiting on an inspection, pre-approval or signing.

Disclosures are required by law. But what are they? A disclosure means a seller has to inform potential buyers of and problems that would affect the value of the property.

Due diligence is doing the work of fully understanding the property you are interested in before buying it. This includes obtaining insurance, reviewing all documents carefully and walking the property.

During a home inspection appliances, plumbing and electrical work are tested. The heating and cooling system are also inspected. This doesn’t affect the monetary value of your home. This is a way for you to determine what state a home is in and if it is worth the financial investment to you.




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Posted by Wanda J. Hall on 9/3/2018

The realization that a family dog or cat has gone missing can be a scary, if not panic-inducing moment. While some cats seem able to fend for themselves in the outside world, if they're gone for more than a day, it's only natural to assume the worst. It goes without saying that cats kept indoors stand the best chance of staying safe and living a long life. However, many cats are determined to explore the outside world regardless of your good intentions, and trying to prevent them from doing so may ultimately be an exercise in futility. To further complicate matters, many cats and dogs are quite resourceful when it comes to spotting and taking advantage of open doors and unlocked backyard gates.

Once they're outside, cats can easily jump over fences, and dogs -- especially puppies -- have a knack for finding and escaping through small openings in the fence (often at the bottom) that you may not have noticed. There are a lot of different possible causes for the disappearance of a pet, but the sense of loss families experience when a beloved pet doesn't return is universal. Since prevention only goes so far with adventurous cats and dogs, it can also be helpful to have a quick response plan ready. Making sure your pet is either micro-chipped or wearing a collar with up-to-date ID tags can increase your chances of getting a lost pet returned to you quickly.

One vital resource to be aware of and connected with is neighborhood social media sites. By finding out if there are any active ones in your area, you can be in a better position to quickly alert your neighbors, in the event your pet suddenly disappears. Since many people are pet owners, they'll be very sympathetic and responsive to an online post of a missing dog or cat. The bottom line is this: Your prospects of a speedy reunion will often improve in direct proportion to how many neighbors know about your missing animal friend and how to contact you.

There's also the relatively old-fashioned, but often effective method of printing out and posting "lost pet" flyers. In addition to posting them in various locations, such as dog parks, neighborhood stores, and pet-oriented businesses, you can also hand them out to neighbors you see when conducting your initial search. For maximum effectiveness, the flyer should say "Lost Cat" or "Lost Dog" at the top of the flyer, and include a good photo of your pet, as well as your phone number and information about when and where they were last seen. Other features, such as breed, color, markings, age, weight, gender, your pet's name, and any unique characteristics should also be included in the flyer to help neighbors identify your pet. Additional tactics and tools for recovering a lost pet are also available through the ASPCA.





Posted by Wanda J. Hall on 8/27/2018

As a first-time home seller, it can be difficult to determine exactly what you need to do to prep your house for the real estate market. Lucky for you, we're here to teach you what it takes to sell a house in any real estate market, at any time.

Now, let's take a look at three important questions that every first-time home seller needs to consider:

1. Am I ready to sell my house?

For many first-time home sellers, the answer to this question is a resounding "No," and perhaps it is easy to understand why.

Adding a home to the real estate market requires home sellers to conduct plenty of real estate research. By doing so, a first-time home seller can determine how his or her house stacks up against comparable residences that are currently available.

Also, it may prove to be worthwhile to complete a home appraisal. This assessment will enable you to identify your house's strengths and weaknesses and complete any property repairs immediately.

2. After I sell my house, where will I go?

It is important for a first-time home seller to think about the big picture. Thus, you'll need to consider where you'll go after you sell your residence.

If you think about where you'd like to relocate, you can start planning accordingly. In fact, you can establish a home selling timeline and find ways to make the most of the time and resources available to you.

In addition, if you need to relocate as soon as possible, this may have far-flung effects on how you market your residence.

A home seller who needs to move right away may be more likely that others to list his or her house at a below-average price. On the other hand, a home seller who can afford to be patient can wait out the real estate market if necessary.

3. What should I expect when my home hits the real estate market?

Unfortunately, the housing market offers no guarantees. This means a dedicated first-time home seller who goes above and beyond the call of duty to prepare a home may watch his or her house linger on the real estate market for months. On the other hand, a home seller who does minimal prep work may watch his or her house sell immediately.

When it comes to getting ready to add your house to the real estate market, there is no reason to leave anything to chance. With an expert real estate agent at your side, you can boost your chances of getting the best results during the home selling journey.

An expert real estate agent can answer any questions that you may have about selling your house. Plus, he or she will help you list your residence, promote it to potential property buyers and set up home showings and open houses.

Ready to add your house to the real estate market? Use the aforementioned tips, and any first-time home seller can seamlessly navigate the home selling process.




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